Articles

Back to articles directory

Cleveland Bus Charter Destinations

Sep 9, 2013 - Steamship William G. Mather

While it is not an everyday affair that one would be able to climb aboard a historical ship that has been restored and learn about the past of its history, it sure would be an interesting thing to do with your friends whenever time permits. Therefore, a visit to the Steamship William G. Mather is possibly one of the out of ordinary kind of trips that you can plan with your friends. In addition to that, if you have never booked or chartered a Cleveland bus in the past for any of your trips, why not make it “extra” out of the ordinary with your friends with this trip to visit the steamship that is currently at 1001 E Ninth St Pier, North Coast Harbor Park, Cleveland?

The Steamship William G. Mather is a restored 1925 Great Lakes bulk freighter that now also plays the role of a floating maritime museum, ever ready to welcome visitors from near and afar to climb aboard it. The steamship is open to the public for visits during the months of May, September and October (on weekends only – from 11am until 5pm) and in the months of June, July, and August, they are open from Tuesdays through Sundays (from 11am until 5pm). However, the opening dates and times are subject to change, so it is always good to check their website first before you place your booking for a Cleveland charter bus to bring you and your friends to visit. Surely you wouldn’t want to turn up at the entrance of the steamship only to be turned away because it is closed due to unexpected reasons. Even if you do have other places to visit after you have toured the Steamship William G. Mather, it would still somehow, in one way or another, dampen the mood among you and your friends if you are not able to visit the steamship.

As soon as you and your friends get off the charter bus, you would proceed to make your way to purchase the tickets to enter the steamship. Upon entering, you will see a movie being played that tells of the shipping world of the Great Lakes during the early and mid 1900s, as well as interviews on some of the crew members of the steamship back then. If you happen to catch the video while it is being played halfway already, don’t worry – you can always wait for it to be repeated and watch the whole thing. After that, you can take a look of what’s inside the ship – the engine room, the crew’s and captain’s quarters, plus the guests’ staterooms and lounges. Photography is allowed, so be sure to have your cameras ready all the time.

Get Quote

Standard text message rates apply